Can You Get Genital Herpes From Touching?

You can get herpes from touching someone else’s skin that has herpes, including:. Genital herpes can be transmitted sexually both when a person has noticiable symptoms and when they don’t. You can get herpes by having vaginal, anal, or oral sex with someone who has the disease. Do not touch the sores or fluids to avoid spreading herpes to another part of your body. For this reason it is imperative not to touch active sores in your mouth or on your genitals, and, if you do, to wash your hands as soon as possible afterwards.

Can You Get Genital Herpes From Using A Razor To Shave Your Upper Lip That Your Mom Used? 2You can get herpes on the genitals if you have genital skin-to-skin contact with someone who has herpes on the genitals or anus or if someone with herpes on the mouth performs oral sex on your genitals or anus. If you touch one of your sores and then touch another part of your body, it is possible to spread the virus to that part of your body. You can get genital herpes even if you’ve had only one or two sexual partners. The key facts about Herpes are that there are many myths about how you catch herpes. Fact: No, it is very common and anyone who has ever had sex can get genital herpes. Myth: I can pass herpes to myself from my mouth to my genitals if I accidentally touch myself.

Unlike a flu virus that you can get through the air, herpes spreads by direct contact, that is, directly from the site of infection to the site of contact. Finally, if you have a cold sore and put your mouth on your partners genitals (oral sex), you can give your partner genital herpes. It is possible for you to pass herpes to someone else even when you do not have sores because the virus can be present without causing any symptoms. Using a condom may reduce your risk of passing or getting genital herpes, but does not protect against all cases. But herpes can spread to other areas of the body. If you get herpes in some area of your body other than the genitals, mouth, or eyes, this is known as Herpetic Whitlow.

Herpes

You can get herpes through direct skin contact with an infected area or from secretions infected with herpes: saliva, vaginal secretions, or semen (including on shared utensils or toothbrushes). HSV1 is the nongenital type, but it can also infect the genital area. That means you can get the virus by touching the blisters or touching something that has come in contact with the blisters and then comes in contact with you before it drys out or cools down. The virus that causes genital herpes can be spread when it is active in the body. Unless the keratin is torn, in a cut for instance, the virus cannot get to an epithelial cell (the type of cells that make up the skin). Transmission can happen even if genitals only touch infected skin, and no penetration occurs. When one partner has genital herpes, it may be a good idea for the other partner to be tested, too. Although there is no cure for genital herpes, an infected person can take steps to prevent spreading the disease, and can continue to have a normal sex life. To infect people, HSV-1 and HSV-2 must get into the body through broken skin or a mucous membrane, such as inside the mouth or in the genital area. If you have HSV-1, be careful touching your eyes and genitals.

Herpes Transmission

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